Sunday, June 29, 2014

Fun at the Fair...

But first, I wanted to show a gorgeous Lotus fabric I found at Fabricmade on Etsy the other day (and is now living with me!).

 This piece is roughly 140cm x 145cms (or 1 1/2 yards x wof)

Isn't it rich and delicious. I have a plan for this lightweight linen fabric, I cannot wait to get started. I've been inspired.

Back to the Fair. The Australian Craft and Quilt Fair in Melbourne that is. Wrapping up today, it opened Thursday. Emma and Sarah (Treehouse Textiles) had a stall there this year (so good) and I went and worked there with Em on Friday. I had a great day meeting old friends and meeting new ones. Our new BOM Ginger Crush (see back wall in photo) which was released on Wednesday has had such a great response and is now almost filled.


Our BOM from last year Citrus Sweet Love is now in booklet form and available for purchase. Send Emma and email if you are interested (info@treehousetextiles.com.au).


While I was there I didn't get much time to shop (too busy chatting!), however being the bookworm that I am I made sure I picked up a couple of buys at the Quiltmania stand.

Michelle Yeo's new book Of Needle, Thimble and Thread
Lots of great projects in here

'Godharis' by Geeta Khandelwal
A wonderful resource and heavy coffee table book!
Lot's of inspiration

Of course I had to buy a sweet bag to put my heavy books in!!


Next time, I obviously need to go back a second day to do more fabric shopping!! xo

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

New Block of the Month Release

Emma (Treehouse Textiles) and I have been very busy working on our second BOM (block of the month) quilt. We are so thrilled to be able to show it to you now...here it is...Ginger Crush!


 Ginger Crush
A Block of the Month
By
Treehouse Textiles & Cabbage Quilts

At last!  We have finished our new Block of the Month, and we just love this quilt and hope you do too. The name says it all "Ginger Crush".... we have chosen muted colours & pastel shades with bright pops of Raspberry, Cerise and Navy.



For those of you who love hexagons we've added a few, and we just couldn't resist adding some whimsical appliqués... Great fun!


For the traditionalists we have "framed” pinwheels & made a drunkard’s path or two.   Applying a fresh, contemporary bent on patchwork & quilting, we have used fabrics that reflect our aesthetics and taste. Designing the quilt blocks was rewarding and enjoyable, we loved the whole process (although there was one or two moments!!), we hope the finished quilt reflects the fun and enjoyment we both had bringing this to you .


Details
  • Limited places – Mail out first week August, 2014
  • $45 per month (postage included) for 14 months (Australia)
  • $55 per month – international (postage included)
  • Finished Quilt Size 79” (2m) x  86” (2.2m)
  • To the best of our ability we will give you the exact fabrics seen in our quilt however on some occasions we may need to substitute, you can be confident that our fabric substitutions will be gorgeous.

To register your interest in ‘Ginger Crush’ please email Emma, with your name and phone number so she can contact you - info@treehousetextiles.com.au

Monday, June 23, 2014

Putting it Together and filling in a hole!

It's still Sunday somewhere in the world right?!!! Continuing on with how I made my improv quilt. If you wish to see more detail in the photo's below, click on the photo's to enlarge.


Ok, so I had all improv blocks made up, but how was I going to put them together. Firstly I placed my improv blocks on my design wall and played around with them until I was happy with the design and felt that the edges of all the blocks nestled in with each other. It was at this point I added a couple of extra strips of fabric onto some of the blocks here and there to help square the blocks up a little.


I decided rather than just sewing the blocks to each other, I wanted to have some sashing strips in between to help each block stand out on its own. I chose the fabric for the sashing strips, then cut various strips (using scissors rather than the rotary cutter) by the width of fabric.


Once the selvedges were cut off, I was able to then lay the strips around the blocks. I needed to keep in mind that I would need to sew this quilt in sections to avoid as many y seams as I could.


The black lines I have drawn onto the photo (above) show the sections the quilt was sewn in and where one y seam landed. I haven't done y seams for a long time, however they really are not difficult (that might be another mini tute for another day!).

When the sections were all sewn together, I added on the final border. Once it was done I stepped back, and realised I didn't like the size of the large empty space (see the arrows).


Filling in a hole
I decided the best way to fill in that large empty space was to applique a strip of colour over it! To do that I sewed up a strip to fill the space using leftover fabrics and included a pretty little dotty selvedge piece for interest. I then pinned the strip in place.....


....and, using my sewing machine and the quarter inch foot, sewed the strip onto the quilt top.


This method of applique is known as front basting and it is very simple and quick. I then unpicked a few my machine stitches and using an applique needle and neutral thread began to needleturn applique the strip in place.





Continue to remove stitches as you go (about 5 or six stitches at once, you don't want to unpick too far ahead).


Because the strip has been machine sewn, when the stitches are removed the fabric 'remembers' where the stitch line was and easily turns under to this point underneath the needle.


I continued all the way around until it was done. I really liked the slightly wonky colourful strip and once the quilt is quilted, you probably won't even notice it was appliqued on later!


Once the strip was appliqued on I was finally happy with the balance and design of the quilt top.


My final mini tute in this series will be to show how I quilted my improv quilt. See you soon. xo

Wednesday, June 18, 2014

Inspired....

....by colour and shape all around!





 Links and Fern photo's taken by my son, Isaac



Sunday, June 15, 2014

A Block and a Filler or Two

Well, last week was a write off, but back now to my regular twice weekly programming!! The last block of my improv quilt I will show is the wonky stars...


I love making wonky stars and these guys are easy. Start off by cutting out the centre square, outer rectangles and outer squares and laying them out on a piece of wadding. I couldn't find my photo of this step, so I've done up a little pic in publisher to show the idea...


Again in all of these blocks, the cutting is just done by eye and with scissors, however if you want to make sure the four outer rectangles and squares are similar sizes, just cut out one square first, then lay the square over three other fabrics and cut. Near enough is good enough, perfection isn't needed in improv blocks!


Now cut four squares larger than the outer squares, then cut them in half to make two triangles. These will become the star points.


Lay one triangle as shown over one of the outer rectangles and stitch along the long side of triangle from point to point. Press open. Repeat with the second triangle.

I'm using the mosaic maker 
from BigHugeLabs 
to make up these little mosaic pics

It's a good idea to trim off the waste fabric as you go...


Now the block is ready to assemble. Lay all the pieces back onto the wadding and sew from left to right in three rows.


Sew the three rows together and the block is done!!


Add a few strips of fabric, three more wonky star blocks and another big block is ready to go!


A Filler or Two:
When creating this type of improv quilt it's great to make up some filler blocks. These can be long, narrow blocks that might add a little length onto the bottom or side of another block. A couple I used here were very easy, the first one was simply a matter of taking lots of my offcuts and sewing them together...



...trim down it's and done!!


The other filler I made was a sweet little triangle block, again using up little offcuts of fabric. I began by cutting the triangles to a similar size....


and sewing together. They give a great jagged effect to the bottom of my churn dash blocks...


So that's it for today. Next time I will show how to put it all together. xo